Mens Sana Monographs
POVERTY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Year
: 2008  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 175--186

Dual Psychological Processes Underlying Public Stigma and the Implications for Reducing Stigma


Glenn D Reeder, John B Pryor 
 Illinois State University, USA

Correspondence Address:
Glenn D Reeder
Psychology Department, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790
USA

People with serious illness or disability are often burdened with social stigma that promotes a cycle of poverty via unemployment, inadequate housing and threats to mental health. Stigma may be conceptualized in terms of self-stigma (e.g., shame and lowered self-esteem) or public stigma (e.g., the general public«SQ»s prejudice towards the stigmatized). This article examines two psychological processes that underlie public stigma: associative processes and rule-based processes. Associative processes are quick and relatively automatic whereas rule-based processes take longer to manifest themselves and involve deliberate thinking. Associative and rule-based thinking require different assessment instruments, follow a different time course and lead to different effects (e.g., stigma-by-association vs attributional processing that results in blame). Of greatest importance is the fact that each process may require a different stigma-prevention strategy.


How to cite this article:
Reeder GD, Pryor JB. Dual Psychological Processes Underlying Public Stigma and the Implications for Reducing Stigma.Mens Sana Monogr 2008;6:175-186


How to cite this URL:
Reeder GD, Pryor JB. Dual Psychological Processes Underlying Public Stigma and the Implications for Reducing Stigma. Mens Sana Monogr [serial online] 2008 [cited 2020 Aug 11 ];6:175-186
Available from: http://www.msmonographs.org/article.asp?issn=0973-1229;year=2008;volume=6;issue=1;spage=175;epage=186;aulast=Reeder;type=0